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Non Bar

The classic sash window layout, large panes of glass were often a sign of the householder’s wealth as large clear glass panes were incredibly expensive.

Half Georgian

As the name suggests Georgian pattern in the upper sash, larger single pane below, generally no horns.

Full Georgian

18th-century slender Georgian design, often 6 panes over 6, but sometimes as many as 12 panes over 12. authentic Georgian layouts are often without horns.

Centre Bar Sash Window

Designed as original victorian sash windows a single vertical glazing bar will have equal sight lines.

Three Light

Has 2 bars 3 equal panes wide, in both the upper and lower sashes.

Georgian Variant

Multiple lights in the upper sash, larger single pane below, generally no horns.

MARGINAL BORDER

Regency period, glazing bars to all sides approx 4″, often with brightly coloured glass sides and corners.

MARGINAL THREE LIGHT

Regency period, glazing bars to all sides approx 4″, often with brightly coloured glass sides and corners.

Asymmetric

A combination sash, three-light design in the upper sash, a centre bar in the lower sash.

True Arch

Designs can also include gothic or sunburst patterns, fixed or sliding styles available.

Swept Head

Often clear large panes but patterns available, either fixed or sliding styles.

The London Sash

The London Sash Window

Coupled Style

On one continuous cill, these coupled frames are beautifully balanced, any patterns, fixed or sliding styles.

1/3rd Split

Upstairs windows are often smaller, transom split 1/3rd, 2/3rd helps keep equal-sized panes.

Coupled Style 3

Normally split 1/4, 1/2, 1/4, often fixed side windows, sliding central sashes and again coupled frames on one continuous cill.

2/5ths Split

Ground floor windows are often far taller, transom split 2/5ths, 3/5ths helps keep equal-sized panes.

GALLERY